DOXA Event Recap

The United Nations Association in Canada (Vancouver Branch) was pleased to sponsor a film at the 2017 DOXA Documentary Film Festival.

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Photo of UNA Vancouver taken by Tara Flynn Development Manager, Doxa Documentary Film Festival

The screening of “Complicit” was held at VIFF’s VanCity Theatre on Saturday, May 6, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. The screening was well-attended, and the audience was clearly engaged in the issues presented in the film.

One of the highlights of the 2017 edition of the DOXA Festival is the Spotlight on Troublemakers, which celebrates courageous dissent in difficult circumstances. Our sponsored film provides an incredible first-hand look at the frontlines of China’s labour movement. It shines a light on the global electronic manufacturing industry in China, where 90% of the world’s consumer electronics are produced.

The featured activists are committed to taking on some of the world’s largest corporations, and they speak openly about abysmal working conditions. Young people work in buildings with poor ventilation, and handle chemicals which have been banned in industrialized Western countries for more than 40 years. Corruption and obstruction run deep, as workers struggle to deal with diagnosis and treatment of occupational diseases, many leading to serious illness or death

Complicit” was also included in the festival’s Justice Forum, so it was followed by a thought-provoking question and answer session led by two guest speakers. Cathy Walker is the former National Health and Safety Director of the CAW (Canadian Auto Workers Union) now UNIFOR. She has worked on China-related projects for the Canadian Labour Congress, the Vancouver & District Labour Council, and the BC Federation of Labour. Fiona Koza is a Business and Human Rights Campaigner at Amnesty International Canada. She works to hold companies accountable for human rights abuses and to ensure access to remedies for people who have been harmed.

The afternoon concluded with informal discussions with audience members who visited the UNAC information table in the lobby of the theatre.

We extend our thanks to our two guest speakers, and to all DOXA staff and volunteers for making this year’s festival such a success. We look forward to working together again next year!

DOXA Film Screening: Complicit

UNA-Vancouver is sponsoring the May 6th screening of Complicit, a documentary film about the detrimental health effects involved in the global electronics manufacturing industry in China.  Complicit is part of the festival’s Justice Forum; thus, it will host a Q&A after the screening. Directed by Heather White and Lynn Zhang, they aim:

to shine a light on what it’s really like for Foxconn factory workers, who produce devices for Apple and other companies.

The film, which was mostly shot undercover, follows Yi Yeting, a former Foxconn employee who was diagnosed with leukemia at the young age of 24. The cause? Benzene poisoning from a cleaning agent that was used while making the iPhone and iPad. Apple banned the substance, along with n-hexane, from its assembly lines back in 2014, following reports that it was leading to leukemia among factory workers. But Yeting is still fighting for Foxconn and other companies to acknowledge benzene poisoning and other issues.

Complicit debuted this past March at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival in London.

Tickets for the May 6th, 2017 screening at VanCity Theatre @ 2pm are on sale through DOXA. Ticket prices range from $11-$15.

To see other films included in DOXA’s 2017 program click here. DOXA runs from May 4th to May 14th.

Canada Green Corps: Call for Applicants

UNSustainableDevelopmentGoals_w_logo-e1442391056454*Notice from Ottawa head office*

Canada Green Corps (CGC) is UNA-Canada’s innovative new youth employment programme designed to bridge talented, yet un-and underemployed, Canadian youth to meaningful employment to ignite Canada’s green economy. CGC participants will undertake four or six-month work-integrated learning placements with various companies, governments, associations, universities and civil society organizations in our cities of focus: Vancouver, Whitehorse, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal and Halifax. CGC participants may assist their employer organizations and communities in reducing their environmental footprint and increasing overall sustainability. Additionally, CGC participants may engage their communities over the course of their placements to identify and address environmental “quick wins” in their communities and workplaces.

Green Corps will officially be extended until Sept 30th, 2017.

UNAC is delighted to be able to provide more opportunities for talented, yet un- or underemployed youth across Canada to gain valuable professional experience through Green Corps. We are also identifying new employer organizations, so please feel free to share this information with potential employers, and youth, in your network.

Click the hyperlinks to find the Checklist for Securing Placements and Finalizing Partnership and the Green Corps flyer.

The search for new Employer partners is ongoing but note that the deadline for youth applications is Monday, March 27th.

Potential youth participants can apply through: https://unpp.wufoo.com/forms/w1vish6y1w0cgf1/

Interested employer organizations should contact Green Corps’ Project Officers, Kanchan Muti (for placements west of Ontario and the Yukon) or Julie-Pier Nadeau (placements in Ontario and east), who are cc’d here. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call Scott Bohachyk at (613) 232-5751 ext 253.

2017 AGM with Marcia Kran

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Marcia Kran. Photo from North Shore News.

We are proud to be welcoming a high-profile UN official as a speaker who will open our Annual General Meeting. Joining our membership for this unique and relevant event will be members of the public and officials, parents and students of the Burnaby School District.

Marcia Kran’s background includes a 35-year career as an international lawyer, senior manager roles in the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and the UN Development Programme, and work as a professor of human rights law at UBC. Ms. Kran was elected Canada’s First UN Human Rights Committee member in over a decade. Committee members are independent experts who monitor implementation of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, a key UN treaty. The committee is the place where contentious human rights issues are brought forward, and recommendations are made in order to meet the international standards put in place by the UN.

 

Please join us on April 3rd, 2017 at:
Byrne Creek Community School’s Centre for Dialogue
7777-18th Street, Burnaby (8-minute walk south from Edmonds Skytrain Station)

Agenda

6:30 – 6:45 UNAC Annual General Meeting
7:00 – 8:00 Marcia Kran keynote and Q&A
8:00 – 8:30 Reception – Coffee/tea and refreshments provided

Communications Coordinator – Open Call

 

UNA-Vancouver is looking for a Communications Coordinator! We need someone who has experience in graphic design, editing, and volunteer management. This volunteer position comes with a $1000 stipend for a 12 month term. Please see the PDF for more details on the position and how to apply. This call will remain open until we have filled the position.

CMNS Coordinator Description

The Role of ASEAN in 2017

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Photo from International Pharmaceutical Quality.

This post was written by website writer, Denea Bascombe.

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations, or ASEAN, is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2017. It was founded on August 8th, 1967 to promote regional economic, political, and security cooperation by the founding fathers of Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Today, it is comprised of ten members, with the original five plus Brunei, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam. The role of ASEAN has changed over the fifty years of its existence, but its adherence to the belief in regionalism has maintained consistent. A 1992 article by S. Rajaratnam in Singapore (written when the North America Free Trade Area (NAFTA) and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) were still new regional approaches) highlighted that the counter-pressures of globalism had made regionalism more difficult to maintain, but optimism existed in that ASEAN was beginning to reflect some of the successes of the more developed European Community (EC). ASEAN is working towards increased security in the region, and maintains the reputation of managing cohesive internal relations and positive international operations.

Today, ASEAN holds regional ground, especially where the participation of the United States in international trade and its affected political influence creates increased uncertainty towards globalism. The uncertainty of the United States’ commitment to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) under a Trump administration may further develop existing sentiments regarding the benefits of Asia-Pacific foreign policy that is less reliant on the United States. This may only be increased by the fact that the Philippines holds the position of 2017 ASEAN Chair; President Rodrigo Duterte has been distancing his country from the United States, including its military cooperation. With the Philippines’ lost position as the United States’ closest ally in the ASEAN region, the role of the United States in Southeast Asian policy, especially over the long term, is increasingly uncertain. This is made only the more complex by the United States’ unclear foreign policy position towards China in early 2017.

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Though Duterte may be unpredictable in some aspects of his leadership, including some activities that call in to question the existence of human rights violations, in other aspects, his policies have provided stability for the region. This includes the surging economic growth in the Philippines, which he strives to expand throughout ASEAN due to his conviction in regionalism, and bettering relations with China, even with the existence of the South China/ West Philippine Sea dispute. Prior to Duterte, ASEAN had not seen such a clear pivot away from the United States, a country providing military and other support, and towards China. However, this could be for the betterment of ASEAN’s ability to produce a clear consensus on issues affecting ASEAN and China. A potential conflict to be aware of, though one that is out of the scope of this editorial, is the potential for some of Duterte’s controversial national policies, especially his insistent drug policies, to cause rifts among ASEAN member states. Still, keeping issues separated, this is unlikely to affect ASEAN’s external relations.

Unfortunately, Duterte’s turn away from the United States is one that the Asia Foundation would highly advise against based on its 2016 report titled Asian Views on America’s Role in Asia: The Future of the Rebalance. The report highlights, among other recommendations, that the United States must “maintain a robust, sustained, and consistent American presence in the Asia-Pacific”; “revive the TPP”; “continue to play a leading role in non-traditional security” and “continue to project American ‘soft power’”. This poses questions as to whether the Philippines’ perception of a United States presence reflects the opinions of other ASEAN member states.

ASEAN’s role in 2017 will largely dictate the extent to which the United States maintains leadership in Asia and internationally. It will also maintain a large influence over ASEAN cooperation with China, and the prospective of heightened or minimized tensions in the South China/West Philippine Sea. Both relationships may be considered of equal importance to ASEAN due to the economic, political, and security implications. However, with the Philippines holding the 2017 ASEAN Chair and its recent statements against United States involvement, it is unlikely that both relationships will be equally pursued. Perhaps part of ASEAN success in this area will depend on whether the United States maintains a balanced relationship with China, and whether there is any reason why ASEAN would be unable to separately and equally pursue their bilateral relationships with the United States and China.

Inspired by the UN: Kaidie Williams

kaidie-williams_headshotKaidie Williams is an International Relations and Economics student at UBC, hailing from the small island state of Dominica. Her interests include public speaking, connecting with people and reading economics-related magazines. Kaidie is deeply involved in many aspects of campus. She is President of the Model United Nations Student Association (MUNSA), Vice Chair of the UBC Vancouver Senate, Senior Advisor for Residence Life, and Student Coordinator of the Caribbean Returning Nationals Foundation. As part of UBC’s International Service Learning program, she recently completed an internship where she worked on implementing UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with a development organization. Verna Yam (in bold) interviewed Kaidie Williams on behalf of UNAC-V.

How did you learn about MUN and start getting involved?

During high school, I went to an event promoting UBC, where they encouraged us to join MUN. I thought that it sounded pretty cool.

But when I entered university and started doing MUN, I was so confused. There were people who had done conferences before and who knew everything. I felt like this was way out of my league. Honestly, there were a few moments where I thought, “This isn’t for me.”

That was all until I went to my first conference in Seattle, where I was blown away. With so many people, great ideas and potential all in one place, you can solve an incredible number of issues in just three days at one conference. That’s what drew me to MUN. I cried on the bus back home because it was such a surreal experience for me: realizing that even if you are from a tiny island, you still have a way of making an impact. Your ideas can be presented and understood, and then intertwined into a bigger picture. That’s when I felt, “Yeah, this is my thing.”

What’s the most valuable thing you’ve learned from MUN?

That every country has a voice, no matter how small or big you are. I’m really interested in small island states, so I appreciate the idea of coalitions where countries come together to present a voice that is just as valuable as the voice of large powers. It’s recognized that you don’t have to be powerful to have influence. You just have to have a voice, and that voice will be heard. Continue reading

Inspired by the UN: Amrit Toor

amrit-toor_headshotAmrit Toor is a fourth-year History Honours student at UBC. With a focus on Canadian feminism in the twentieth century, Amrit is writing his honours thesis on feminist movements at UBC in the 1970s. His extracurricular involvement on campus includes serving as Vice-President External of the Model United Nations Student Association (MUNSA), second term as Co-President of Oxfam UBC, and Editor-in-Chief of the Atlas Undergraduate Journal of World History. Amrit has volunteered for numerous organizations locally, including Surrey Food Bank, Greater Vancouver Food Bank, Red Cross and Médecins Sans Frontières. Verna Yam (in bold) interviewed Amrit on behalf of UNAC-V.

How did you learn about MUN and start getting involved?

In high school, one of my teachers asked me if I could host and chair a MUN conference because he had heard about my background in public speaking. I had no idea what he meant by that – I had never heard about MUN before, I had never been a delegate before; so I got a very quick run through of MUN procedure and what it was all about before I was just dropped in to chair two conferences.

 Did you eventually try being a delegate?

Once I entered university, I heard about MUNSA, the MUN club at UBC, and started delegating. I got into conversing with people about international issues and used my past experiences with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to inform the arguments I was making. That’s where my interest in being a delegate and involved in MUN stems from – my background in NGO work.

What’s the most valuable thing you’ve learned from MUN?

The most valuable thing that I’ve learned is an understanding of the very real and tangible aspect of the discussion we have in MUN. MUN provides this unique opportunity in which students can become directly engaged in international issues, without necessarily being an expert or having a job that would enable them to go directly into those fields.

Furthermore, it’s a really good awareness opportunity. For those working with NGOs, it’s an opportunity to promote what certain movements there are in the world. It’s also a great chance to learn other people’s perspectives on the failures and successes of the international community, and to develop a more comprehensive understanding of what’s really happening out there. Continue reading

Inspired by the UN: Elena Ganacheva

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Elena Ganacheva is an International Relations student (Commerce minor) at UBC. Actively involved in the Model United Nations (MUN) community there, Elena’s biggest commitment is leading a team as Secretary-General to organize UBCMUN, a conference that attracts over 300 delegates across North America each year. Elena’s past leadership positions include Vice-President Internal of the MUN Students Association at UBC and director for committees at various MUN conferences. Verna Yam (questions in bold) interviewed Elena on behalf of UNAC-V.

Can you tell us more about your interests?

I’m really passionate about international issues and learning about them, as well as helping others learn more about them too. I really enjoy MUN as a means to do that.

How did you learn about MUN and what moved you to try it out?

I learned about MUN at Clubs Days, where all student clubs set up booths to promote their activities in September. My friend and I were looking for opportunities and found the MUN Student Association (MUNSA). I really liked the idea of MUN, especially since I used to do debate, and realize there is no collaboration in debate, there is only argument. So, I was attracted to the idea of MUN since I get to use my debate skills but also collaborate with other delegates to find solutions to world issues.

So how exactly did you start getting involved?

I bit the bullet and signed up to go with MUNSA to Northwest MUN-Seattle right away. I represented Bolivia in the General Assembly, which was really interesting because we talked about sustainable development, and Bolivia advocates for the rights of Mother Earth. If I had not represented Bolivia in that committee, I would never have learned about the initiatives that Bolivia is working on.

What’s the most valuable thing that you’ve learned from MUN?

Simulating the UN and pretending to be a diplomat within that framework really opened my eyes to how international relations actually works in the UN, and what the challenges are to implementing changes that we want in the world. I also learned about the limitations of the UN framework and how the UN can actually effect change within their limitations. Continue reading

Youth for Human Rights Day – Event Re-Cap

The Youth for Human Rights Foundation (B.C. chapter) and Ubuntu for Human Rights International Society co-organized an event dedicated to celebrating the International Day for Human Rights this past December 10th at The Metro (759 Carnarvon Street, New Westminster). One of the keynote speakers was Senator Mobina S.B. Jaffer (who is also an Honorary Patron of UNA-Vancouver). Several human rights groups such as UNA-Vancouver, the Global Peace Alliance, and Child Aid International were invited to host tables at the event. Each table had a representative talk about their group for a couple minutes so participants were able to learn about each organization.

The event began with a demonstration of 30 short videos dedicated to each human right listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted two years after the establishment of the United Nations Association of Canada in 1946. You can find these informative videos at http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/what-are-human-rights.html

After a First Nations welcoming ceremony, Senator Jaffer highlighted the importance of human rights advocacy and, in particular , the rights of homeless people in Vancouver.

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Akmal Bazarov speaking on behalf of UNA-Vancouver.

In his capacity as Director-at-Large in UNA-Vancouver, Akmal Bazarov shared information about the UNA in Canada and assured participants that the UNA of Canada continues to promote UN values indicated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and UN Conventions on human rights within its mandates in order to achieve the UN`s Sustainable Development Goals.

dsc_0024For example, in addition to supporting the principles outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Canada has ratified seven principal UN human rights conventions and covenants: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR – accession by Canada in 1976), the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR – ratified by Canada in 1976), the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CAT – ratified by Canada in 1987), the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC – ratified by Canada in 1991), the International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD – accession by Canada in 1970), the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW – ratified by Canada in 1981), and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD – ratified by Canada in 2010). As a ratifier, Canada must submit reports on how it implements each of these treaties.

We hope that this event contributed to raising awareness among Canadians on UN values and human rights, especially in the rapidly changing political situation in the world.

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Upcoming Series “Inspired by the UN”

Stay tuned for the upcoming 3-part series, “Inspired by the UN”, to be published here starting in January 2017.

Verna Yam, an International Relations Major and Asian Area Studies Minor at the University of British Columbia, will share her interviews with student leaders from around Vancouver who are involved with Model United Nations (MUN). MUN is an extra-curricular activity where students simulate the workings of the UN. These students, who are currently enacting real change in their communities, share not only how they got involved with MUN, but what they learned from their experiences and how the UN continues to shape their work and life today.

Although it may be hard to see that the United Nations (UN) has a widespread and far-reaching impact on a daily basis, MUN is one way students are inspired by the work of the UN in the world. MUN is a growing phenomenon throughout the world, and especially in Vancouver. vernayamphoto

 

2016 Renate Shearer Award for Human Rights: MOSAIC

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December 10th marks the annual observance of the UN-mandated International Human Rights Day. It commemorates the day on which, in 1948, the UN General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights defines human rights as “rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination.

Each year, International Human Rights Day is celebrated by the local branch of the UN Association of Canada, with its partner Community Legal Assistance Society (CLAS) with an award to a local organization or individual who is active in the field of human rights. The award is named after the late Renate Shearer who was a social planner and human rights activist in the City of Vancouver in the 1970s.

This year the award is being given to MOSAIC – the Multilingual Orientation Services Association for Immigrant Communities. Established in Vancouver exactly 40 years ago in 1976 MOSAIC, whose goal is to serve and support immigrant and refugee communities, has now expanded into other Lower Mainland communities including Burnaby and Surrey.

MOSAIC has demonstrated its support for new arrivals in BC in many unique ways. It was the first immigrant service organization to provide a weekly legal clinic on immigration and poverty law which was otherwise not available to its clients. Early in its existence, MOSAIC also took the initiative to help immigrant communities deal with an epidemic of domestic violence. The programme specifically provided targeted counseling and therapeutic intervention for violent husbands as well as the women and children who lived with them.

In addition MOSAIC provides settlement services, job training and mentoring, interpretation services, prenatal classes and child care as well as a variety of other services to support newcomers – men women and young people – to our community.

MOSAIC was at the forefront in welcoming refugees from Central and South America during its early years – long before regular federal or provincial government intervention. Today it is in the forefront of welcoming to BC refugees from Syria and other parts of the Middle East and North Africa.

UNAC Vancouver, with its partner the Community Legal Assistance Society, is proud to honour MOSAIC, as well as to celebrate Renate Shearer, in whose name this Human Rights Award is given. MOSAIC and Ms. Shearer reflect the finest values of our community.

Date: Thursday, December 8th, 2016

Time: 5:30-8pm

Location: JJ’s Restaurant, Vancouver Community College (250 W. Pender)

Cost: Dinner by donation

2016 Splane Lecture: How Disability figures in progressive Social Policy

unacto1UNAC Vancouver, the World Federalists Movement in Canada, UBC School of Social Work, and the Liu Institute for Global Affairs will host the annual Richard B. Splane lecture on November 28, at 5:30 pm at the Liu Institute at UBC. The theme for this year is the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is an international human rights treaty and is intended to protect the rights and dignity of persons with disabilities.

The public lecture this year will be given by Catherine Frazee O.C., who is a professor of Distinction in the Disabilities program at the Ryerson University. Frazee is a member of DAWN (Disabled Women’s Network Canada), has served on the Board of Directors of Canadian Abilities Foundation, and the Canadian Association of Community Living, chairing that organization’s Task force on Values and Ethics. She served as the Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission from 1989 to 1992. In addition to several honorary degrees, she is an Officer of the Order of Canada for her advancement of the rights of persons with disabilities and as an advocate for social justice.

This year, the lecture will be co-sponsored with UBC Centre for Inclusion and Citizenship. This is a free public event but please RSVP here.